Part of this feeling of superiority might be class-related.

The central conflict, however, is the conflict within the main character, Jadine.

Margaret is a prejudiced white woman, a veritable stereotype.

All you need is to feel
a certain way, a certain careful way about people older than you are." (242)
As Jadine leaves with her black baby-seal "killer" coat, Ondine and Sydney doubt that she will even bury them.

The Dominique blacks are to them "swamp women" or "horsemen"--depersonalized figures.

In her room she assumes that Son wants to rape her:

She knows herself to be "inauthentic" and hollow when she sees the woman in yellow with the tar-colored skin--" that woman's woman-that mother/sister/she; that unphotographable beauty" (46).

When Son is discovered in her bedroom closet she goes into near hysterics.

I have always known the importance of tradition through my family. I spent my childhood in East Germany and my summer and winter holidays were spent in my parents’ hometown, the Delta. My siblings and I developed in two worlds, one on top of the other—in an order that resembles the strata of earth with the lower world being foundational. The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta was (and is) that foundation.

You good as dead right now." "Rape?


It's hard for them not to be white people.

A descendant of the "blind race" she also knows how to detach Brer Rabbit (Son) from Jadine, the "Tar Baby." She leaves Son on the far side of Isle des Chevaliers where he has a choice...

Some try, but most don't make it.""She's not a yalla," said Son.

Jadine proves how little she has learned when she considers the new help "the mulatto with a leer" (225) and calls Alma Estée "Mary." She is truly the Race-Traitor.
Thérèse knows that Jadine is lost.

You should have seen her two months ago.

He is shamed afterwards by Jadine who gives him "his original dime." He leaves and upon his return finds the apartment empty.
Jadine escapes to Isle des Chevaliers where she rejects her family and culture one final time.

What you see is tanning from the sun.

The region (or space) provided answers to my parents’ names, speech, foodways, music and politics. All the answers were knowable in the small village hidden by trees, stretched over red mud and filled with generation of my folks and watermelon. One thing—maybe the most important thing—I learned from my folks, and the ground on which they stood, was to always speak to the elders that came and left the room. One learns early the seriousness of speaking to elders whom are moving in and out and through.

Yallas don't come to being black natural-like.

I have always known the importance of tradition through my family. I spent my childhood in East Germany and my summer and winter holidays were spent in my parents’ hometown, the Delta. My siblings and I developed in two worlds, one on top of the other—in an order that resembles the strata of earth with the lower world being foundational. The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta was (and is) that foundation.

Son refuses to be in debt to "one of the killers of the world" (204).

And
you don't know anything, anything at all about your children and anything at all
about your mama and your papa." (227-8)
Son renounces Jadine's previous plans to marry a white man, saying: "People don't mix races; they abandon them or pick them" (270).