These sections are discussed below.

 At the end of the lit review, you stateyour hypotheses.

The method section has three parts:

The questionnaire is one of the most widely used instruments in research in the management sciences; it is also commonly used in business for market research. Effectively used, it is a highly efficient tool for obtaining data of a both structured (i.e. the answers are predetermined) and unstructured (the answers are open to the respondent) nature.

Using the output from the 1st crosstab, tell the reader if it was supported.

Do the same thing as crosstab 1.

All that term she tried to inspire Eunice to become at least a pioneer missionary in some deadly and dangerous zone of the earth, for it was intolerable to Miss Brodie that any of her girls should grow up not largely dedicated to some vocation. 'You will end up as a Girl Guide leader in a suburb like Corstorphine', she said warningly to Eunice, who was in fact secretly attracted to this idea and who lived in Corstorphine. (81)

Then you tell the reader if the results you see are statistically significant.

This section contains information on the Chicago Manual of Style method of document formatting and citation. These resources follow the 16th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style, which was issued in September 2010.

If your table has significant results talk about the strength of the relationship.

The following systems will help keep you organized:

The bibliography will usually include the relevant sources consulted in producing your essay, even if you have not referred to or quoted from them directly. The order is alphabetical and determined by the authors' names. Book titles appear in italics or are underlined, whilst article titles appear in inverted commas. When referring to books you should include the author's name, place of publication, the publisher, and the date when the book was published. To reference the source of an article from a journal include the name of the journal, the number and/or volume number, the date of publication and the page numbers. There are several styles for laying out a bibliography, but the same elements appear in each, and you must be consistent. Consult the handbooks to be found in the libraries for further details.

Consider the following questions:

Miss Brodie has different plans for Rose; she is to be a 'great lover' (146), and her tutor audaciously absolves her from the sins this will entail: 'she is above the moral code, it does not apply to her' (146). This dismissal of possible retribution distorts the girls' judgement of Miss Brodie's actions.

In the introduction you will need to do the following things:

Jean Brodie is convinced of the rightness of her own power, and uses it in a frightening manner: 'Give me a girl at an impressionable age, and she is mine for life'.1 This is Miss Brodie's adoption of the Jesuit formula, but, whereas they claim the child for God, she moulds the child for her own ends. 'You are mine,' she says, '... of my stamp and cut ...' (129). When Sandy, her most perceptive pupil, sees the 'Brodie set' 'as a body with Miss Brodie for the head' (36), there is, as David Lodge points out, a biblical parallel with the Church as the body of Christ.2 God is Miss Jean Brodie's rival, and this is demonstrated in a literal way when one of her girls, Eunice, grows religious and is preparing herself for confirmation. She becomes increasingly independent of Miss Brodie's influence and decides to go on the Modern side in the Senior school although Jean Brodie makes clear her own preference for the Classical. Eunice refuses to continue her role as the group's jester, or to go with them to the ballet. Cunningly, her tutor tries to regain control by playing on her religious convictions:

How to choose your research method(s)

Dahlgren, Pete. . London: Sage Publishers, 1995.
Dubois, Ellen. "Antipodean Feminism." 206 (July/August 1994): 127-33
Fussel, Paul. . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1975.
Gledhill, Christine. "Melodrama" in . Ed. Pam Cook. London: BFI, 1985. 73-84
Lodge, David. "The Uses and Abuses of Omniscience: Method and Meaning in Muriel Spark's " in David Lodge . London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1971. 119-44
Pettifer, James. London: Penguin, 1993.