— Nelson M., Cortlandt Manor, NY

“Thank you for opening my spiritual eyes. I see with more clarity than I have ever seen before!”

— Emmanuel Dagher, Author, Expansion Catalyst, Humanitarian

Of course, in different life situations many different courses of action might be appropriate. But the point here is that metta does not mean that we denigrate ourselves in any situation in order to uphold other people's happiness. Authentic intimacy is not brought about by denying our own desire to be happy in unhappy deference to others, nor by denying others in narcissistic deference to ourselves. Metta means equality, oneness, wholeness. To truly walk the Middle Way of the Buddha, to avoid the extremes of addiction and self-hatred, we must walk in friendship with ourselves as well as with all beings.

Look for ways to make moments work to the advantage of someone else besides yourself.

Essay on kindness and generosity

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” — Maya Angelo

An Unbiased View of Essay On Kindness And Generosity

For every kind or charitable thought, feeling, or action expressed in my life, there must be a hundred that are impatient, intolerant, or judgmental. How can I work to change the balance sheet in my relationships with others and begin living out the kind of life I know I'm meant to express?

Essay on kindness and generosity gimp articles


The Ultimate Guide To Essays On Kindness To Animals

But this is us laughing with us, and with all of society, to further our goals. That's different than someone exploiting us for their own private goals.

This excerpt is for Free Distribution Only.

Some activists, including me, at certain times have sought to reclaim the words society has thrown our way. I realize others may not choose to ever use words like "mad" or "lunatic" or "crazy" or "bonkers" to describe themselves. We probably ought not use those colloquial terms in certain contexts, like arguing our rights in front of the United Nations or in a court hearing. But now and again, some of us like to have some fun and be outrageous, such as at MAD PRIDE events, where it is okay to be creative and reclaim language that has been used against us.

by David Oaks, Director, MindFreedom International

In the right context, I love to recapture some of the words used about us. We do, after all, get a lot of the fun animals such as squirrely, crazy like a fox, bats in the belfry and loon.

In fact, can we ever perfectly describe reality, at all?

After all, English is a living language that changes. Back when psychiatrist Loren Mosher created a model alternatives, "Soteria House," the idea of a peer was just about anyone who did not have mental health training. In other words, a caring member of the general public was considered a "peer." But more and more, we are hearing the term "peer" somehow become used as shorthand for "person who has used officially licensed mental health services."

The term "mentally ill" is very much a narrow medical model.

So speaking of everyday English, what about slang words for us? As with any oppressed minorities, these words can hurt, and sometimes the words are meant to hurt.

By the way, have you been noticing a few “quotation marks”?

I've heard that some feel that using alternatives to medical model language somehow diminishes the seriousness of people's personal pain, that, for example, being diagnosed with "clinical depression" underlines the gravitas of a crisis better than, say, "sad." But there are words in the English language more fierce than "sad." How about, for example, "extreme and catastrophic life-threatening anguish"? That phrase has a lot more gravitas than any clinical language I've ever heard! (The origin of the word "clinical" by the way, is simply related to "bed.")